Alessio Barone physiotherapist

Alessio Barone


Consultant Physiotherapist

Expertise

I’m interested in giving to my patients the best possible holistic approach so I keep exploring the human being as much as I can, in a never-ending learning process, incorporating the latest Evidence Based Medicine with the ancient wisdom of Eastern Cultures. That’s why after 13 years at University I continued to specialise in Vestibular Rehabilitation, balance training, TMJ disorders, headaches and migraines, chronic pain, postural analysis and myofascial meridians, cranio-sacral therapy, visceral manipulation, CBT, mindfulness, Dentosophie, Chinese and Indian Acupressure, Applied Kinesiology, Connective Tissue Reflex Massage, Guasha Massage, Myofascial Pompage, Spinal and Joints Manipulations, Sport Injuries and NeuroMuscolar Taping

Qualifications

MSc in Exercise Science for prevention and adaptation at Urbino Univeristy (Italy), Bsc(Hons) Physiotherapy at Pescara University (Italy), Level 3 Advanced Myofascial Induction Therapy at Tupimek Madrid (Spain), Bsc (Hons) Sports and Exercise Science at Urbino University (Italy), Physical Education Diploma at the Italian National Institute of Physical Education (ISEF) Urbino, Diploma as Cognitive Behavioural Trainer for Autism at Yale University. Member of CSP and HCPC

What makes a good physiotherapist?

I found very important the ability to modulate and tailor the therapeutic plan on the client’s expectation and personal goals, modulating between manual therapy, stretching, strength and conditioning.

Moreover, the passion for learning and a good open mind are always fundamental as well as the ability to listen and notice beyond the words, those little but very important hidden details like for posture, body language, chosen words, type of breath, quality of movement, etc.

The most challenging case to treat

I like challenges in general, so I am always enthusiastic to treat clients with a long history of chronic pain, after they tried all sort of therapy and doctors, without arriving yet at a final resolution.

I remember a 17 years old girl with headaches and migraines since she was 7 years old. She arrived after touring most of UK trying many medications and different doctors. After an accurate assessment, I found lots of craniosacral asymmetries but also some visceral entrapment (stomach and large intestine have connection with the neck muscles, the liver with the eyes and the gall bladder with sinus, forehead and sides of the head). After 6 sessions she was pain free with very rare mild episodes. At that stage I asked her to write a diary connecting those episodes with life events, feeling, emotions, repetitive thoughts. It came out how she was having relapses only after family frictions or arguments with inner emotional turmoil, in particular when struggling in the communication with her mother and getting upset with her. After a few months practising some journaling, mindfulness and meditation she became more self-aware of her emotions, improving her ability to cope with life events, preventing or self-managing every further episode.

What makes a good physiotherapist
I found very important the ability to modulate and tailor the therapeutic plan on the client’s expectation and personal goals, modulating between manual therapy, stretching, strength and conditioning.

Moreover, the passion for learning and a good open mind are always fundamental as well as the ability to listen and notice beyond the words, those little but very important hidden details like for posture, body language, chosen words, type of breath, quality of movement, etc.

What is the most common advise you give to your patients?

To listen to their body. There is no point to push a training or an exercise if there is some pain or discomfort which is a clear message of something wrong. In fact, I ask them to forget the classic “no pain no gain” which is for body building and not for rehabilitation. I prefer them to substitute it with “less is more” and “focus and intention plus attention”. In this way, they can learn how a few daily exercises, with the right alignment avoiding compensations, can do much more than an extreme effort, overall if paying the right attention to what is happening in their bodies and what sensations they can perceive. Finally, I remind them how doesn’t exist a good strength without a same level of flexibility, so a good myofascial stretching needs to become part of their daily life.